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Corporate Reiki services - beat stress!


Happy and healthy employees are a necessity for any company and with work-related stress levels soaring, stress management is essential. Reiki is a fantastic way of boosting wellbeing and general health. We take the stress out by coming to your London office to provide Reiki treatments for your employees or to to even teach them a Reiki course, so they can take their wellbeing into their own hands. Reiki treatments and Reiki courses are relaxing and fun. Reiki also boosts creativity and intuition and what business doesn't want employees who come up with creative solutions and inject a healthy dose of business instinct into their work?

Check out our corporate Reiki services in more detail on our online brochure on the left, or below and contact us for more information.
Team Building Reiki Days

Team Building Reiki Days


It's true that we are thrown together with the people we work with, but that doesn't mean we can't have a fantastic, communicative team that keeps a business running like a well-oiled machine. On a Reiki day employees will learn how to self-administer Reiki and use it for themselves on a physical and emotional level, as well as learning meditations to help cope with stress. Participants will get the opportunity to scan each other for energy blockages, practice Reiki on each other and get to know their colleagues on a

Team Building Reiki Days

It's true that we are thrown together with the people we work with, but that doesn't mean we can't have a fantastic, communicative team that keeps a business running like a well-oiled machine. On a Reiki day employees will learn how to self-administer Reiki and use it for themselves on a physical and emotional level, as well as learning meditations to help cope with stress. Participants will get the opportunity to scan each other for energy blockages, practice Reiki on each other and get to know their colleagues on a whole new level. Team building Reiki days are fun, relaxing, informative, zen and extremely useful.

 

Details

Cost: POA
Maximum attendees: 10 in one session.
Hours: 10am to 5pm
Materials: All attendees will receive a comprehensive Reiki manual and a certificate of attendance.


Syllabus

  • What is Reiki? - Brief history / timeline / Fundamentals
  • Science of Reiki - Brief information about the latest research on energy healing.
  • Denju (Reiki attunement) - an enlightening process that enables anyone to be a Reiki healer.
  • Detox process - Discussion about the cleansing process caused by attunements.
  • Benefits of Reiki - There are many and we will discuss some of them.
  • Reiki hand positions - Basic hand positions for self-treatment with Reiki.
  • Signs of release - indicators that Reiki is working and having the desired effect.
  • Using Reiki safely - contraindications for those on certain medications.
  • Reactions to Reiki -a brief explanation of the reactions Reiki can cause such as tingling, heat etc.
  • Scanning - how to scan the body for energy blockages. Attendees will practice on each other!
  • Shirushi / Jumon / Kotodama - the Reiki symbols and how to use them for physical and emotional healing.
  • Hands on Reiki - How to practice Reiki on yourself.
  • Reiki practical - a chance to practice Reiki on each other.
  • Reiki meditations - extra tools for relaxation, boosting wellbeing and stress management.
Reiki treatments in the workplace

Reiki treatments in the workplace


Sit back, relax and enjoy some precious moments of zen calm. Ahh...that's better. Who needs expresso when you've got Reiki to boost your employees energy and concentration. We are happy to trek to your London office(s) on a weekly or monthly basis to offer short Reiki treatments to employees, either at their desk or during their lunch hour. Reiki is non-invasive and no massage or manipulation is involved. A qualified Reiki practitioner places their hands just above the client (or directly on the head, shoulder or back area if agreed by

Reiki treatments in the workplace

Sit back, relax and enjoy some precious moments of zen calm. Ahh...that's better. Who needs expresso when you've got Reiki to boost your employees energy and concentration. We are happy to trek to your London office(s) on a weekly or monthly basis to offer short Reiki treatments to employees, either at their desk or during their lunch hour. 

Reiki is non-invasive and no massage or manipulation is involved. A qualified Reiki practitioner places their hands just above the client (or directly on the head, shoulder or back area if agreed by the client) and channels external energy into the client to promote a sense of wellbeing, improve health and reduce stress. Sensations can include: heat, tingling and a sense of calm and deep relaxation.  

Fees for our corporate Reiki treatments

Call out fee - £30 (to cover our travel expenses)

  • 15 minute Reiki treatment - £15 per session. 
  • 20 minute Reiki treatment - £20 per session.
  • 30 minute Reiki treatment - £30 per session.

Workplace Stress

Workplace Stress


Most people spend the best part of the day at work and this is where stress often becomes a major problem, for both employers and employees. According to the 2008/09 Labour Force Survey (LFS) an estimated 415,000 individuals in Britain, working in the last year, believed that they were experiencing work related stress at a level that was making them ill. Estimates from the LFS suggest that self-reported work related stress, depression, or anxiety accounted for around 11.4 million lost working days in Britain in 2008/09 (Source: Health and Safety

Workplace Stress

Most people spend the best part of the day at work and this is where stress often becomes a major problem, for both employers and employees. According to the 2008/09 Labour Force Survey (LFS) an estimated 415,000 individuals in Britain, working in the last year, believed that they were experiencing work related stress at a level that was making them ill. Estimates from the LFS suggest that self-reported work related stress, depression, or anxiety accounted for around 11.4 million lost working days in Britain in 2008/09 (Source: Health and Safety Executive.) In fact, work related stress is one of the biggest causes of sick leave. The HSE define stress as,

The adverse reaction a person has to excessive pressure or other types of demand placed upon them.

A distinction is made between pressure that acts as a motivating factor and stress, which relates to excessive pressure. Stress in itself doesn’t constitute an illness, but prolonged, excessive stress may contribute to or cause illness. 

No one is completely immune from stress and whether the stress originates from our home life or work environment, it still has an impact on our working life. 

Specific causes of work related stress include:
  • Poor working conditions
  • Long working hours
  • Relationship with colleagues
  • Victimisation or bullying
  • Lack of job security and stability
  • Difficult commute to and from work
  • How the company is managed
  • Inability to cope with a heavy work load
  • Insufficient workloads
  • Lack of control
  • Lack of a clear job description
  • No recognition or reward for good performance
  • No opportunity to voice complaints
  • Weak or ineffective management
  • Inflexible working hours
  • Too much or too little responsibility
  • Working in an unhealthy environment
Symptoms of stress include:
  • Anxiety and irritibility.
  • Mood swings.
  • Paranoia.
  • Increased blood pressure.
  • Sweating.
  • Muscle tension.
  • Dry mouth.
  • ‘Butterflies in stomach’.
  • Difficulty concentrating and making decisions.
  • Headaches, palpitations or hot flushes.
  • Shaky hands.
  • Dry mouth.
  • Difficulty sleeping.
  • Waking up during the night.
  • Excessive intake of alcohol, caffeine, cigarettes or unhealthy foods.
  • Tics such as hair pulling or scratching.
  • Tearfulness, depression or suicidal feelings.
  • Chest pain.
  • Loss of appetite.
  • Diarrhoea or constipation.
  • Loss of sex drive.
  • Worsening of skin or breathing conditions.
Work Stress and Mental Health

Work related stress and mental health are interwoven and work related stress may exacerbate or even activate an existing mental health problem that the individual would otherwise have effectively handled, without it impacting adversely on their work. Mental health problems and stress can have different causes. Stress may be related to events at work, where as mental health problems may arise through external causes, such as divorce or bereavement. The symptoms of both are often similar and it is difficult to distinguish when stress transcends into a mental health problem. A GP will usually make the relevant diagnosis.

Signs of stress among employees:
  • High absenteeism and sick levels.
  • Low morale and commitment.
  • Poor performance and productivity.
  • High staff turnover.
  • Customer complaints.
  • A possible increase in accidents.

By taking steps to reduce stress among your employees you can mitigate the impact of these problems.

Employer Responsibilities

Employer Responsibilities


Whilst there is no statute specifically covering stress in the workplace, employers are expected to fulfil certain duties under the: Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, to assess the risk of stress-related ill health caused by work activities. Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, to undertake measures to control any risk. Disability Discrimination Act 1995, to ensure that those with a disability are not discriminated against. In some cases 'anxiety', 'stress', and 'depression', may qualify an individual as disabled under the act, if there is a long-term impact on

Employer Responsibilities

Whilst there is no statute specifically covering stress in the workplace, employers are expected to fulfil certain duties under the:

Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999, to assess the risk of stress-related ill health caused by work activities.

Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, to undertake measures to control any risk.

Disability Discrimination Act 1995, to ensure that those with a disability are not discriminated against. In some cases 'anxiety', 'stress', and 'depression', may qualify an individual as disabled under the act, if there is a long-term impact on their ability to perform day-to-day tasks at work. 

Protection from Harassment Act 1997, to protect against bullying in the workplace. 

There are also other regulations requiring employers to consult their employees on health and safety matters.

HSE Management Standards

The HSE has developed voluntary Management Standards to help reduce levels of work related stress among British employees and aid employers in measuring their performance in managing the causes of stress, as while as identifying areas for improvement. Developed in 2004, these standards encourage employers to take steps to prevent stress by taking a risk assessment, which usually involves questioning employees about job satisfaction within the six areas delineated below. If any problems are identified, employers should then discuss solutions with their employees. The organisation then needs to establish an action plan detailing measures that will be taken. 

The primary sources of stress at work delineated by the standards are:

 Main causes of stress  What employers can do about it
 Demands: Employees often experience stress if        their workload is too heavy.  Pay attention to workload, work patterns,  training needs and whether flexible hours are  possible.
 Control: Employees may perform poorly if they lack  control over their work.  Look at employee input and how actively they  are involved in their job.

 Support: Absenteeism often increases if  employees feel they cannot express issues troubling  them to managers.

 Encourage employees to discuss the issues  causing stress and keep employees informed.
 Relationships: A failure to build good working  relationships can lead to bullying and grievances.  Check the company’s policies for handling  grievances, bullying, poor performance and  misconduct.
 Role: Employees will become anxious if unsure what  is required of them.  Review the induction process, ensure job  descriptions are accurate.
 Change: If change is managed poorly it can lead to  insecurity.  Plan ahead and keep employees in the loop  on organisational change.

For more information on stress at work see www.hse.gov.uk and www.acas.org.uk.

What employers can do to tackle work related stress
  • If workloads are too high consider how they might be reduced and ensure that targets are realistic. Encourage delegation of work where possible.
  • Keep employees informed to reduce uncertainty about jobs.
  • Be communicative and approachable.
  • Ensure staff are using their holiday entitlement.
  • Ensure employees are suited to their roles.
  • Ensure employees understand what their roles require of them.
  • Review people’s performance so you can identify areas where extra training is required.
  • Encourage employees to discuss any problems with you and offer them opportunities to give feedback about their work.
  • Offer reward and recognition for a good work performance.
  • Provide opportunities for career development.
  • Ensure that effective disciplinary and grievance procedures are in place to deal with bullying and harassment.

Work/life balance programs that aim to tackle stress among employees have demonstrated numerous benefits such as:

  • Attracting new employees.
  • Retaining staff.
  • Increasing diversity in skills and personnel.
  • Increasing morale.
  • Reducing sickness and absenteeism.
  • Improving working relationships between colleagues.
  • Encouraging employees to demonstrate more commitment and teamwork.
  • Increasing productivity and satisfaction.
  • Reducing stress and ‘burnout’.
Helping employees with stress outside work

Employers are not obliged to do anything about the stresses employees are experiencing outside work, but offering support can be useful. Some of the following things may help:

  • Be sympathetic and allow the employee to voice anything they wish to discuss with you.
  • Consider offering the employee the option of more flexible working hours or even paid time off to resolve their problems if necessary.
  • Suggest outside support groups.
  • Make the employee aware of support offered by your organisation that may be able to help them, such as:
  1. Childcare services.
  2. Fitness and stress programs.
  3. Family leave policies.
  4. Eldercare initiatives
  5. Referal program to relevant organisations.
  6. Other leaves of absence.
  7. On site seminars and workshops (on subjects such as stress, nutrition, smoking etc).
Coping with Work Stress

Coping with Work Stress


The founder of modern stress research, Hans Seyle, suggested that stress is not completely avoidable, or else we would have to avoid life, which is of course an impossible task. The key is to understand what can be changed, develop skills to bring about change and know when to take a step back, avoid a situation or look for new, creative solutions to life’s problems. There is no single solution to stress in any walk of life, whether its origins are in the work place or our external environment. Tackling stress

Coping with Work Stress

The founder of modern stress research, Hans Seyle, suggested that stress is not completely avoidable, or else we would have to avoid life, which is of course an impossible task. The key is to understand what can be changed, develop skills to bring about change and know when to take a step back, avoid a situation or look for new, creative solutions to life’s problems. There is no single solution to stress in any walk of life, whether its origins are in the work place or our external environment.

Tackling stress requires thought, planning and action. Ignoring stress and hoping it will subside of its own accord is rarely an adequate solution. Below are some general tips on tackling work place stress.

Good time management

Focus on the tasks that matter. Think about what your priorities are in life and what you want to achieve. Work out some short-term and medium-term goals to help you achieve those things. If you have lots to do write a list – single lists are better than multiple lists, which can become overwhelming and unattainable.

Don’t forget to take a lunch break

Having rest will improve your concentration. Take regular short breaks throughout the day, wherever possible.

Delegate where possible

If something can be better handled by someone else then delegate. Relinquish the desire to control every aspect of your work. Sometimes we all need help, that is why most businesses consist of teams rather than a single individual.

Know when to say no

Don’t take on too much and realise that you do have a choice. It may be useful as a short-term strategy but becoming the employee who ALWAYs says yes can have negative consequences for you in the long-term.

Arrive earlier at work

If you can, get to work a bit earlier to give you more time to settle down and get stuck into your work, rather than running late, which causes stress in itself.

Don’t stay silent

Speak to your manager or another team member if you are feeling under pressure, or find an outside organisation that can help. Don’t suffer in silence. Under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 your employer is obliged to ensure your health and safety, and conduct risk assessments for work-related stress.

Deal with bullies

If you are being bullied at work, explain to them that their behaviour is unacceptable and making you feel uncomfortable. Explain that if it happens again you will take action. Remain composed and calm and note down the times and dates when incidents took place, what witnesses were present and what events occurred. Ask your colleagues if they are also having problems with the individual. If you are a member of a union you can talk to a representative who will be able to help you. Be sure to go through official channels and if you require counselling or other help speak with your doctor.

 
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